Some copies from past – Spring Summer 2020

Spring Summer 2020. Guardando le sfilate mi sono accorto di dettagli che spaziano dal trucco alle calzature. Dettagli che sono spesso brutte copie di cose passati. Spesso in molti dimenticano le mode trascorse, così giornalisti e pubblico pensano si tratti di elementi frutto di creatività e innovazione. Vediamone alcuni.

Spring Summer 2020. Looking at the fashion shows I noticed details ranging from make-up to footwear. Details that are often bad copies of past things. Often many people forget the fashions passed, so journalists and the public think that these elements are that are the result of creativity and innovation. Sometimes, often, it is better the original. Let’s see three of them.

Style should celebrate individuality through the Twiggy’s make-up of the 60s, with the intention of emphasis the look, asserts Gucci Beauty. We are at Milan Fashion Week
and the models come on stage with bleach eyebrows covered with thick and dark artificial eyelashes. I personally believe that sometimes it would be better just copying from the past, avoiding slipping in a result lacking in sense, research. What do you think? In my comparison, on the left Gucci (ph Vogue Italia), in the right Twiggy in the 60s.

In my comparison Sharon Tate 1968 vs Mugler at his Paris Fashion Week SS 2020.
The unkempt eyebrows and fixed towards the other are not new. Ps: not even the eyeliner line is new, Chanel had already done it.

Pierre Cardin sequin gown, 1965 and Pierre Balmain on runway in Milan, 27/09/2019 for his ss 2020, ph Vogue Italia. Different dresses, same mood.

Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche 1976-77 and Celine prêt-à-porter ss 2020

Boots with a particular design, which have the heel taken from the red “Delman” shoes, preserved at the Met Museum and dated 1937 – 1939. The upper part is instead a mix between the cuissardes of Roger Vivier, 1967, and the creations of André Courreges, in the photo year 1970.

A little curiosity, which has nothing to do with the above. In June I made two sketches for a project, revisiting some constriction shirts for the characters, based on their oppressed identities. What a surprise yesterday, to see that Gucci developed the same concept. On the left, my figures on the right, the images of Vogue Italia from Spring Summer 2020

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“The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume”.

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Barbara La Marr: Heroin & Death in Old Hollywood

Barbara La Marr, young actress addicted to morphine and heroin

«Il via alla moda dell’autodistruzione 
era stato dato qualche anno prima
da Barbara La Marr, 
attrice soprannominata “la troppo bella”, 
consegnata alla storia per esser stata 
la prima morta di overdose da eroina: era il 1926.

Barbara conobbe tutti i tipi di droga, 
conservava la cocaina in un prezioso cofanetto in oro.

Volto struggente, fascino maledetto e distruttivo 
e occhi allucinati furono il dettaglio 
che caratterizzò quella perduta bellezza.»

Dal mio libro

Scheda e Shop qui:

“IL MACABRO E IL GROTTESCO NELLA MODA E NEL COSTUME”

«The fashionable way of self-destruction had been given a few years earlier, however, by Barbara La Marr, an actress nicknamed “the girl who was too beautiful”, consigned to history for having been the first death of a heroin overdose: it was 1926.

Barbara knew everyone the types of drugs, he kept cocaine in a precious gold casket.

A poignant face, damned and destructive charm and hallucinated eyes were the details that characterized that lost beauty.»

From my book “The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume”

Click on the pic for info & shop

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STYLES – GENRES – DISGUISES: Bari International Gender film festival

Il prossimo 25 settembre alle ore 15.00 prende il via la conferenza dedicata al tema Gender in occasione del Bari International Film Festival,rassegna che esamina, ricerca, studia,capolavori della storia del cinema in rapporto a genere, identità e orientamento sessuale. Location di questo evento lo storico Palazzo delle Poste di Bari in Piazza Cesare Battisti, 1. Il palazzo è sede dell’Università degli Studi ed è un meraviglioso esempio dell’architettura razionalista fascista, Luciano Lapadula – storico della moda e scrittore – analizzerà il tema “Stili – Generi – Travestimenti“. Lo studio dei segni legati alla moda, al trucco, alle acconciature che a partire dal 1968 hanno diviso e mescolato generi e simbologia sessuale, da Twiggy a Bowie, da Coccinelle ad Amanda Lear. L’intervento di Luciano Lapadula è tratto dal suo libro “Il Macabro e il Grottesco nella Moda e nel Costume“, acquistabile al link: https://www.progedit.com/libro-589.html

 

Salone centrale centro studenti_1palazzo poste luciano lapadula storia moda bari

Ex Palazzo delle Poste di bari – veduta interna

On September 25th at 3.00 pm, the Gender conference will start afor Bari International Film Festival, a review that examines, researches, studies, masterpieces of the history of cinema in relation to gender, identity and sexual orientation. Inside the historic Palazzo delle Poste in Bari (Cesare Battisti Sq, 1), a marvelous example of the fascist rationalist art, Luciano Lapadula – fashion historian and writer – will analyze the theme “Styles – Genres – Disguises”. The study of signs related to fashion, makeup, hairstyles that since 1968 has divided and mixed genres and sexual symbology, from Twiggy to Bowie, from Coccinelle to Amanda Lear. Luciano Lapadula’s speech is based on his book “The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume“, available at the following link: https://www.progedit.com/libro-589.html

luciano lapadula big festival bari conferenza storia moda gay

william dafoe

Willem Dafoe all’inaugurazione del Festival

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Acquista il mio libro. Clicca sull’immagine per info.
Shop my Book “The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume“.

Click on the pic for info.

Shop my Book “The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume”
https://www.progedit.com/libro-589.html

20s Flapper girls from China

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Una nuova tipologia di donna nasce in Cina durante gli anni ’20. La sfrenatezza della vita occidentale, legata al ritrovato benessere, invade l’Oriente e la sua moda che lentamente è sedotta dall’immagine à la Garçonne. Il pesante cerone, gli ombrellini di carta, i fascianti kimono in seta cedono il passo ad impalpabili abiti  in chiffon, a trucchi meno vistosi, ad acconciature “alla maschietta”. E si fa strada ad Hollywood la prima tra le attrici cinesi, Anna May Wong, destinata a divenire un’icona di stile per il mondo intero. Di seguito una selezione di immagini che testimoniano questa rivoluzione sociale e vestimentaria in Cina.

© COPYRIGHT: Luciano Lapadula

A kind of woman was born in China during the 1920s. The wildness of Western life, linked to the refounded welfare, invades the Orient and its fashion that was slowly seduced by the style “à la Garçonne”. The heavy make-up, the paper umbrellas, the kimono silk bindings give way to impalpable chiffon dresses, to less conspicuous make-up, to “boyish” hairstyles. And the first of the Chinese actresses, Anna May Wong, was making her way to Hollywood, destined to become a style icon for the whole world. Below for you a selection of images that testify to this social and clothing chinese revolution.

© COPYRIGHT: Luciano Lapadula

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Illustrazione cinese anni ’20. Due ballerine indossano un abito tradizionale chiamato Cheongsam, rivisitato per un look occidentale tipico della “Flapper Girl”. I capelli sono corti e in stile Garçonne. Calzature T-Bar. 

Cheongsam china shangai dancer 1920s 20s blog blogger fashion history luciano lapadula

Chinese illustration from the 20s. Two female dancers wear a dress called Cheongsam, rivisited in Western look, typical of the Flapper Girls. The hair is short and in Garçonne style. T-Bar shoes

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Ni Hongyan, Chinese film actress popular in the Chinese film industry in the late 1920s. Fashion Magazine and Amazing Belt (seems to be a modern Alaya!) for this beautiful girl in her swimsuit

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Silk Socks, Waves Hairstyle and Cigarette for a smoking flapper

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Huang Huilan wife of the  Chinese diplomat Wellington Koo, popular in the western world as Madame Wellington Koo or Hui-lan Koo

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still Madame Wellington Koo

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Two asian ladies in 20s fashionable outfits

Here is Anna May Wong visiting Chicago 20s china fashion 1920s history chinese women

March 25, 1928. Here is Anna May Wong visiting Chicago. Trousers, Mary Jane shoes and Cloche hat for the first Chinese American Hollywood movie star, as well as the first Chinese American actress to gain international recognition

Anna May Wong

“The Dangerous” Anna May Wong

the dangerous Anna May Wong

Anna May Wong a glamorous Femme Fatale. 1928

Anna May Wong -1929 photo by Paul Tanqueray cloche fur

Anna May Wong in 20s

Anna May Wong -1929 photo by Paul Tanqueray

Anna May Wong -1929 photo by Paul Tanqueray

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Stripes & Disorders from fashion in 1914 – 1915

 

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Quello della striscia come motivo ornamentale o pattern per indumenti merita una riflessione approfondita. Mi limito qui, in sintesi, a farvi riflettere sul ruolo che questa geometria assume nel campo della semiologia e quindi della storia del costume. La riga, la striatura, la striscia, riveste il corpo interrompendo in modo violento un “tutto” sottoesposto generando così in chi guarda l’abito – e allora chi lo indossa – un senso di confusione, misto a eccitazione e persino ricusazione. Come il simbolo di un divieto, quello di un’allerta, o come una sbarra che impedisce un passaggio, la striscia nel suo consueto bicolore, cattura l’attenzione spezzando la regola dell’uniforme: irriverente e ribelle diviene alla moda intorno al 1914 – 1915, e non a caso. La Belle Époque con la sua sfrenatezza cancella il ruolo della donna “angelo del focolare” in virtù di una nuova figura emancipata, pronta a riprendere il proprio ruolo sociale. I venti di guerra poi, soffiano tra le strade delle città, profumando l’aria di polvere da sparo. La riga così spunta violenta dalle tele di Egon Schiele e dagli abiti di Paul Poiret, comparendo sui vestiti delle signore alla moda, simbolo del tempo nuovo e della pericolosità di quello futuro.

That of the stripe as an ornamental motif or garment pattern deserves a thorough reflection. In short, I limit myself here to reflect on the role that this geometry assumes in the field of semiology and therefore of the history of customs. The line, the streak, the strip, covers the body violently interrupting a “whole” underexposed thus generating in the viewer the dress – and then the wearer – a sense of confusion, mixed with excitement and even rejection. As the symbol of a ban, that of an alert, or like a bar that prevents a passage, the strip in its usual two-color, catches the attention breaking the rule of the uniform: irreverent and rebel becomes fashionable around 1914 – 1915, and not by chance. The Belle Époque with its wilderness cancels the role of the woman “angel of the hearth” by virtue of a new emancipated figure, ready to resume its social role. The winds of war then, blow through the streets of the city, smelling the air of gunpowder. The line so violent check on the clothes of fashionable ladies, symbol of the new time and the danger of the future.

Portrait of Edith Schiele in a Striped Dress - Egon Schiele, 1915

Egon Schiele Portrait of Edith Schiele in a Striped Dress – 1915

stripes history fashion blog magazine blogger 1910 1900s 1914 1915 art arte moda storia luciano lapadula costume scrittore blogger quadro schiele arte museo lgano ferrara piacenza

Egon Schiele and wife Edith (muse) with Striped Dress Sitting, ca 1915. – artwork by Schiele 1915 – Emilie Louise Flöge – 1914 – wearing one of Gustav Klimt’s dress shirts that he made just for her

stripes history fashion blog magazine blogger 1910 1900s 1914 1915 art arte moda storia luciano lapadula costume scrittore blogger

Matisse – Striped Jacket, 1914

stripes history fashion blog magazine blogger 1910 1900s 1914 1915 art arte moda storia luciano lapadula costume scrittore blogger quadro

Viv in Blue Stripe, 1914 – Robert Henri (

llustration de mode française Georges Barbier petit manteau de velours dans costumes parisiens 1914 stripes

French Illustration by Georges Barbierfor Costumes Parisiens – 1914

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The Delineator – July 1914

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Fashion Plate from The Delineator – July 1914

stripes history fashion blog magazine blogger 1910 1900s 1914 1915 art arte moda storia luciano lapadula costume scrittore blogger photography rivista

The Modern Priscilla, October 1915

Les Modes (Paris) 1914 Costume tailleur par Redfern

Les Modes, Paris – 1914 Costume tailleur by Redfern

Les Modes (Paris) 1914 Robe d'apres-midi par Zimmermann

Les Modes, Paris – 1914 Robe d’apres-midi byZ immermann

stripes history fashion blog magazine blogger 1910 1900s 1914 1915 art arte moda storia luciano lapadula costume scrittore blogger photography

1914 c. fashion for a day at the races

fashion history stripes moda righe luciano lapadula blog blogger olga skott 1914 1915 20s

Olga Skott Vänersborg – 1914, by K & A Vikner – Vänersborg Museum

1915 a fool there was

Theda Bara in a scene from the film ‘A Fool There Was’ 1915

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Theda Bara in a scene from the film ‘A Fool There Was’ 1915

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Fashion and Make-Up from Silent Movies

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Fatali, struggenti, maledette: le donne del cinema muto hanno lanciato mode dell’assurdo, che racconto nel mio libro. Per voi un breve estratto nel video.

Fatal, tormenting, cursed: the women of silent cinema have launched fashions of the absurd, which I tell in my book. A short excerpt in the video for you.

From my book: “The Macabre and the Grotesque in Fashion and Costume”

Dal mio libro: “Il macabro e il grottesco nella Moda e nel Costume”


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When Madonna was Evita

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Cinema, Moda, Musica incontrano la storia. Siamo nel 1996 e una camaleontica Madonna indossa i panni di Evita Peron, attrice e adorata First Lady argentina nell’immediato dopoguerra. Per il film, diretto da Alan Parker, Italia e Francia gareggiano tra loro in sala costumi: la sartoria romana Tirelli cura il guardaroba con Penny Rose, vestiti e tailleur ricreati su modello di quelli indossati da Evita si alternano a capi autentici anni ’40 e il New Look di Dior trionfa per la sera con autentici capolavori di alta moda.

Le pellicce indossate da Madonna sono create da Fendi, per la casa di moda un classico dai tempi di “Gruppo di Famiglia in un Interno”. Per le calzature, invece, ci si ricorda di Ferragamo, brand amato in vita dalla Peron. Nulla dunque è trascurato, le bellissime acconciature di Martin Samuel completano un aspetto il cui risultato è straordinario: il film vince l’Oscar e la costumista, per gli 85 abiti presenti nel film, si aggiudica il BAFTA.

E forse questo grande lavoro di ricerca e ricostruzione sarebbe piaciuto a Monsier Christian Dior, il quale un giorno disse:

“l’unica regina che io abbia mai vestito è stata Evita Peron”.

Luciano Lapadula

Cinema, Fashion, Music meet history. We are in 1996 and a chameleon-like Madonna wearing the clothes of Evita Peron, actress and beloved Argentine First Lady in the immediate post-war period. For the movie, directed by Alan Parker, Italy and France compete in the costumes room: the Roman tailoring Tirelli takes care of the wardrobe with Penny Rose, clothes and suits recreated on the model worn by Evita alternate with authentic ’40s and Dior’s New Look style gown for the evening with authentic high fashion masterpieces. The furs worn by Madonna are created by Fendi, for the fashion house a classic from the time of “Conversation Piece”. For the shoes, however, they remember Ferragamo, a brand loved by Peron in life. Nothing is therefore overlooked, the beautiful hairstyles of Martin Samuel complete an aspect whose result is extraordinary: the movie wins the Oscar and the costume designer, for the 85 dresses in the film, is awarded the BAFTA. And perhaps this great research work and reconstruction would have pleased Monsieur Christian Dior, who one day said:”The only queen I ever dressed was Eva Peron.”

Luciano Lapadula

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madonna as evita peron dresses same fashion dress fur fashion cinema movie history moda gown dior fendi white suit tailleur christian hat

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